The future bypass channel will protect more than 2,400 acres of neighborhoods in Fort Worth from the highest level of flooding. However, the bypass channel can’t accomplish this alone. In times of flooding water will be moving through the future bypass channel but there has to be a way to slow that water down so we aren’t flooding our neighbors to the east. A series of valley storage sites (think creating water storage areas downstream to slow water down) is crucial to the Central City Project.

The amount of material moved as well as the locations themselves were carefully chosen. These valley storage sites provide the needed flood protection but also provide multiple use opportunities. In many cases (Riverside Park and Gateway Park for example) USACE will excavate the valley storage site and then that area can be turned over to the City of Fort Worth to provide wonderful park amenities for our city.

This site will also provide Ecosystem Improvements to the area:

  • Existing grasslands dominated by non-native species would be converted to native grasslands, upland and riparian woodlands, aquatic (oxbow) stream habitat, or emergent wetlands;
  • Existing upland woodlands would be enhanced or converted to riparian woodlands or aquatic (oxbow) stream habitat;
  • Existing riparian woodlands (two locations) would be enhanced;
  • Existing aquatic habitat would be re-established as aquatic (oxbow) stream habitat or emergent wetlands; and
  • Some components of the existing levee system will be used to create the large area of riparian woodlands that would be the major ecosystem improvement feature.

The excavation of the designated valley storage sites has already begun, and will continue through the duration of the Central City Project. USACE has already completed the sites at Samuels Ave., Riverside Park and Riverside Oxbow/Gateway Park Phase 1. Currently, work is underway at Riverside Oxbow/Gateway Park Phase 2.

See the map above to show the designated valley storage sites related to the Central City Project.

2019-11-07T14:38:26-06:00 November 7th, 2019|TRVA Blog|